Boris Johnson Calls Labour ‘Supine Invertebrate Protoplasmic Jellies’

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Boris Johnson mined the English language yet again to find a novel way to insult the Labour opposition ahead in U.K. opinion polls: “Supine invertebrate protoplasmic jellies,” resurrecting a term he used in 2013.

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The reason? For not agreeing with him on the Brexit divorce bill.

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Under attack for flip-flopping on Brexit and the need for Britain to keep its financial commitments to the European Union, the foreign secretary said that he had been misquoted.

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His famous quote about how the EU could “go whistle” if it expects the U.K. to pay a bill was -- Johnson explained -- a response to a figure being floated of 100 billion euros ($117 billion). He then defied Labour lawmakers to disagree with him.

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“Now, the figure I heard was 100 billion - is that side of the House, would they cough up a hundred? Would you? Would you? I think they would, I think they would, the supine protoplasmic invertebrate jellies. They would.”

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Back in April he called the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, a “mutton-headed old mugwump” who could never win an election. In fact, Corbyn did so well that the Tories lost their parliamentary majority in the June snap vote.

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