Photographer: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Photographer: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Trump’s Unrequited Love for Britain

Donald Trump said Theresa May's Brexit plan is likely to kill off a U.S. trade deal. Read more.

Fresh from insulting NATO allies and lobbing a verbal hand grenade at British Prime Minister Theresa May, U.S. President Donald J. Trump touched down in the U.K. for his first visit since taking office.

Trump loves to say how much he fancies Britain—its palaces, its history, its pageantry, its politics and, of course, its golf courses. After all, his mother was born in Scotland.

If only the nation would reciprocate. Some two-thirds of 1,652 Brits surveyed by YouGov earlier this year said Trump has been a poor or terrible president. When a formal state visit was proposed last year, more than 1 million signed a petition to call it off, 10 times the number needed to force a debate over the matter in Parliament. His trip was later downgraded to a working visit. 

A schedule was crafted to keep Trump as far away as possible from the public: dinner at Blenheim Palace with executives, tea with the Queen at Windsor Castle and a working retreat with May at her country estate, Chequers. He’s mostly avoiding his boisterous London opponents, moving around by helicopter before heading north to Scotland to spend the weekend at his Turnberry golf resort.

Protests against the president and his policies were planned nonetheless, pretty much everywhere he might be. Here are the highlights of Trump’s visit.

 

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Protesters join a Women's March in central London to demonstrate against President Trump's visit to the U.K.

Photographer: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images 

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U.S. President Donald Trump and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May at the start of their bilateral meeting at Chequers in Aylesbury, U.K.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg 

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U.S. First Lady Melania Trump tries her hand at bowls with British Chelsea Pensioner army veterans, in London.

Photographer: Jason Alden/Bloomberg 

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The presidential motorcade waits outside the Prime Minister's country residence, Chequers, during the bilateral meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, in Aylesbury, U.K.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg 

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The 'Trump baby' blimp is raised above demonstrators in Parliament Square in London.

Photographer: Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg 

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A caged demonstrator in gorilla suit and Trump mask in Parliament Square.

Photographer: Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg  

Amnesty International activists drape an anti-Trump banner from Vauxhall Bridge, opposite the U.S. embassy.

Photographer: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images 

Trump and First Lady Melania disembark from Air Force One at London Stansted Airport.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg 

Protest placards lean against a van outside the entrance to Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire before a dinner hosted by Prime Minister Theresa May.

Photographer: Andrew Matthews/PA Images via Getty Images       

Protestors gather at the gates of Blenheim Palace, where Trump is due to visit.   

Photographer: Matt Cardy/Getty Images 

Onlookers photograph Marine One as it flies over London.

Photographer: Jack Taylor/Getty Images 

Donald and Melania Trump leave the U.S. ambassador's residence, Winfield House, in London, to head to Oxfordshire for dinner at Blenheim Palace.

Photographer: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images     

Supporters and protestors stand outside the entrance to Blenheim Palace ahead of the dinner hosted by Theresa May.

Photographer: Stefan Rousseau/PA Images via Getty Images      

Donald Trump, Theresa May, Melania Trump and Philip May walk together to the steps in the Great Court to watch the bands of the Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards perform a ceremonial welcome at Blenheim Palace.

Photographer: Ben Stansall/Pool via Bloomberg 

Melania Trump, Donald Trump, Theresa May and Philip May applaud the Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards at Blenheim Palace.

Photographer: Ben Stansall/Pool via Bloomberg