Bloomberg Law Podcast

Hosts June Grasso, Michael Best, and Greg Stohr speak with prominent attorneys and legal scholars, analyzing major legal issues and cases in the news. The show examines all aspects of the legal profession, from intellectual property to criminal law, from bankruptcy to securities law, drawing on the deep research tools of BloombergLaw.com and BloombergBNA.com.

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Hosted by June Grasso and Michael Best

  • Bloomberg Law Brief: Court Allows NC License Plates (Audio)

    Mar 14, 2016

    Noah Feldman, a Harvard Law School professor and Bloomberg View columnist, and William Marshall, a law professor a the UNC school of law, discuss an Appeals Court decision that allows North Carolina to issue license plates reading "Choose Life," while also refusing to produce tags that support pro- abortion views. The 2-1 verdict, which came from the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, comes after a Supreme Court case that determined that specialty license plates in Texas represented government speech, allowing the state to reject a license plate that included the confederate flag. They spoke with Bloomberg Law host June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law: Court Allows NC License Plates (Audio)

    Mar 11, 2016

    Noah Feldman, a Harvard Law School professor and Bloomberg View columnist, and William Marshall, a law professor a the UNC school of law, discuss an Appeals Court decision that allows North Carolina to issue license plates reading "Choose Life," while also refusing to produce tags that support pro-abortion views. The 2-1 verdict, which came from the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, comes after a Supreme Court case that determined that specialty license plates in Texas represented government speech, allowing the state to reject a license plate that included the confederate flag. They spoke with Bloomberg Law host June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law: Baltimore Cop Made to Testify (Audio)

    Mar 11, 2016

    Corrects audio link

  • Bloomberg Law Brief: Judge Goes Against Supreme Court (Audio)

    Mar 11, 2016

    Christina Ponsa, a law professor at Columbia Law School, and Ruthann Robson, a law professor at CUNY School of Law, discuss the case of a Puerto Rican federal judge who ruled that the right to same sex marriage that the Supreme Court found was constitutionally protected last June does not apply in Puerto Rico because it is a commonwealth with a unique constitutional status. They spoke with Bloomberg Law Host June Grasso and guest host Greg Stohr from Bloomberg News on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law: Judge in PR Goes Against Supreme Court (Audio)

    Mar 10, 2016

    Christina Ponsa, a law professor at Columbia Law School, and Ruthann Robson, a law professor at CUNY School of Law, discuss the case of a Puerto Rican federal judge who ruled that the right to same sex marriage that the Supreme Court found was constitutionally protected last June, does not apply in Puerto Rico because it is a commonwealth with a unique constitutional status.They spoke with Bloomberg Law host June Grasso and guest host Greg Stohr from Bloomberg News on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law Brief: Sanders Sues Over Ohio Voters (Audio)

    Mar 10, 2016

    Richard Briffault a law professor at Columbia University Law School and Nate Persily, a law professor at Stanford Law School, discuss how democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has sued Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted for trying to block 17-year-olds from voting in the state’s presidential primary next week, claiming Husted tried to ’disenfranchise’ people who are 17 now, but will be 18 by the general election. They spoke with Bloomberg Law hosts Michael Best and June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law: Sanders Sues Ohio Secretary of State (Audio)

    Mar 9, 2016

    Richard Briffault a law professor at Columbia University Law School and Nate Persily, a law professor at Stanford Law School, discuss two voting-related legal cases. In the first, democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has sued Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted for trying to block 17-year-olds from voting in the state’s presidential primary next week, claiming Husted tried to ’disenfranchise’ people who are 17 now, but will be 18 by the general election. The second topic explores the pros and cons of early voting in presidential races; specifically in the case of Donald Trump in Louisiana, where he won the primary through early votes, but lost on election day itself. They spoke with Bloomberg Law hosts Michael Best and June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law Brief: Baltimore Cop Made To Testify (Audio)

    Mar 9, 2016

    George Newhouse, a partner at Dentons, and Amy Dillard, a professor at the University of Baltimore, School of Law, discuss a Baltimore court order that requires Officer William Porter to testify against all five of his co-defendants in the case of Freddie Grey’s death, clearing the way for the state to move ahead with long-delayed prosecutions. They spoke with Bloomberg Law host June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law: Baltimore Officer Made to Testify (Audio)

    Mar 8, 2016

    George Newhouse, a partner at Dentons, and Amy Dillard, a professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law, discuss a Baltimore court order that requires officer William Porter to testify against all five of his co-defendants in the case of Freddie Grey’s death, clearing the way for the state to move ahead with long-delayed prosecutions. They spoke with Bloomberg Law host June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

  • Bloomberg Law Brief: High Court Rules in AL Case (Audio)

    Mar 8, 2016

    Professor Steven Sanders of the Indiana University Maurer School of law, and Professor Katherine Franke, Director of the Center for Gender and Sexuality law at Columbia Law School, discuss a Supreme Court ruling that overturned an Alabama court order prohibiting a lesbian woman from having contact with the three children she adopted and helped raise. The ruling, which was published without dissent, reinforces the court’s stand on gay rights after legalizing same-sex marriage across the country last year. They spoke with Bloomberg Law hosts Michael Best and June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s "Bloomberg Law."

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